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Politician & Activist

Abraham Lincoln

One of the greatest presidents of American history.  A self-educated, who become lawyer, serves as legislator and was elected 16th president of United States.

Lincoln is known for his leadership during the American Civil War (1861 – 1865) and for signing the Emancipation Proclamation, an executive order changing the legal status of slaves to ‘free’.

  • Born: 12th February 1809, Sinking Spring Farm, Kentucky, U.S.
  • Died: 15th April 1865 (aged 65), Washington, D.C., U.S.
  • Presidential term: 4 March 1861 – 14 April 1865
  • Children: Robert Todd Lincoln, William Wallace Lincoln, Edward Baker Lincoln, Tad Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln Quotes

Folks are usually about as happy as they make their minds up to be.

Abraham Lincoln

When I do good, I feel good. When I do bad, I feel bad. That’s my religion.

Abraham Lincoln

Whatever you are, be a good one.

Abraham Lincoln

Do I not destroy my enemies when I make them my friends?

Abraham Lincoln

And in the end it is not the years in your life that count, it’s the life in your years.

Abraham Lincoln

That some achieve great success, is proof to all that others can achieve it as well.

Abraham Lincoln

I’m a success today because I had a friend who believed in me and I didn’t have the heart to let him down.

Abraham Lincoln

Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man’s character, give him power.

Abraham Lincoln

It often requires more courage to dare to do right than to fear to do wrong.

Abraham Lincoln

Things may come to those who wait, but only the things left by those who hustle.

Abraham Lincoln

Always bear in mind that your own resolution to succeed is more important than any one thing.

Abraham Lincoln

We can complain because rose bushes have thorns, or rejoice because thorn bushes have roses.

Abraham Lincoln

Those who look for the bad in people will surely find it.

Abraham Lincoln

I will prepare and some day my chance will come.

Abraham Lincoln

I am not bound to win, but I am bound to be true. I am not bound to succeed, but I am bound to live up to what light I have.

Abraham Lincoln

Every person’s happiness is their own responsibility.

Abraham Lincoln

The best way to predict your future is to create it.

Abraham Lincoln

You cannot escape the responsibility of tomorrow by evading it today.

Abraham Lincoln

I am a slow walker, but I never walk back.

Abraham Lincoln

When you reach the end of your rope, tie a knot and hang on.

Abraham Lincoln

You can tell the greatness of someone by what makes them angry

Abraham Lincoln

All I have learned, I learned from books.

Abraham Lincoln

Give me six hours to chop down a tree and I will spend the first four sharpening the axe.

Abraham Lincoln

The best thing about the future is that it comes one day at a time.

Abraham Lincoln

The better part of one’s life consists of his friendships.

Abraham Lincoln

Character is like a tree and reputation its shadow. The shadow is what we think it is and the tree is the real thing.

Abraham Lincoln

I do not think much of a man who is not wiser today than he was yesterday.

Abraham Lincoln

I am not concerned that you have fallen — I am concerned that you arise.

Abraham Lincoln

I don’t know who my grandfather was; I am much more concerned to know what his grandson will be.

Abraham Lincoln

My great concern is not whether you have failed, but whether you are content with your failure.

Abraham Lincoln

You can have anything you want if you want it badly enough. You can be anything you want to be, do anything you set out to accomplish if you hold to that desire with singleness of purpose.

Abraham Lincoln

Life is hard but so very beautiful.

Abraham Lincoln

About Abraham Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln was born on 12 February 1809 in a log cabin in LaRue County, Kentucky, United States.

When he was about 6 years old his family moved to southern Indiana (1816). During his teenage life had a brief schooling, as he started to work early age to support his family.

Lincoln late early 20s his family moved to Macon County in southern Illinois (1830), where Lincoln started working on a river flatboat freight down the Mississippi River to New Orleans.

He was self-educated and became a lawyer, Whig Party leader, Illinois state legislator, and U.S. Congressman from Illinois.

In 1849 he returned to his law practice but became vexed by the opening of additional lands to slavery as a result of the Kansas–Nebraska Act.

He returned to politics in 1854, becoming a leader in the new Republican Party, and he reached a national audience in the 1858 debates against Stephen Douglas.

Lincoln ran for President in 1860, sweeping the North in victory.

Pro-slavery elements in the South equated his success with the North’s rejection of their right to practice slavery, and southern states began seceding from the union.

To secure its independence, the new Confederate States of America fired on Fort Sumter, a U.S. fort in the South, and Lincoln called up forces to suppress the rebellion and restore the Union.

As the leader of moderate Republicans, Lincoln had to navigate a contentious array of factions with friends and opponents on both sides.

War Democrats rallied a large faction of former opponents into his moderate camp, but they were countered by Radical Republicans, who demanded harsh treatment of the Southern traitors.

Anti-war Democrats (called “Copperheads”) despised him. There were irreconcilable pro-Confederate elements who plotted his assassination.

Lincoln managed the factions by pitting them against each other, by carefully distributing political patronage, and by appealing to the American people.

His Gettysburg Address became a historic clarion call for nationalism, republicanism, equal rights, liberty, and democracy.

Lincoln scrutinized the strategy and tactics in the war effort, including the selection of generals and the naval blockade of the South’s trade.

He suspended habeas corpus, and he averted British intervention by defusing the Trent Affair. He engineered the end to slavery with his Emancipation Proclamation and his order that the Army protect escaped slaves.

He also encouraged border states to outlaw slavery, and promoted the Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution which outlawed slavery across the country.

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Lincoln managed his own successful re-election campaign. He sought to reconcile the war-torn nation by exonerating the secessionists.

On April 14, 1865, just days after the war’s end at Appomattox, he was enjoying a night at the theatre with his wife Mary when he was assassinated by Confederate sympathizer John Wilkes Booth.

Lincoln’s marriage had produced four sons, two of whom preceded him in death, with severe emotional impact upon him and Mary.

Lincoln is remembered as the United States’ martyr hero, and he is consistently ranked both by scholars and the public as the greatest U.S. president.